Paul Pearson – founder of Alphatise

Paul Pearson is a results-driven leader who has a passion for people, innovation, and driving business performance upward.   He is known for being a successful change leader who makes tough, smart, and insightful business decisions that lead organisations he works with to increase profitability.

Paul’s areas of expertise include leadership, strategy development and problem solving.   One of his true passions is digging deep to understand key factors which could prevent organisations from growing and becoming profitable.  From there, he systematically addresses each one to turn them into opportunities which yield the greatest results.

Paul has a vast technical and service knowledge, which spans multiple industries including server technology, wireless handheld devices, social and multimedia services, application development and online advertising.

Hard work, hard work and more hard work. ….. When launching a project of this scale, you really need to be committed and ready to sacrifice everything to see the company succeed.

alphatise.com @alphatise facebook

 

Tell us a little bit about your idea and what made you decide to take the plunge and make it happen?

Alphatise is a new business with transformational product!  We are creating an online marketplace that lets consumers drive deals on items they want – leading to suppliers selling those items based on actual demand.  It is a bit like group buying sites such as Groupon but the deals offered are driven by the people using the site and the price they want to pay.

Although I came up with the idea back in March 2012, I was probably the biggest critic of the product.   I have been involved with a few successful start up’s in the past so I knew the amount of commitment it would take to get the product successfully to market.  However, several months later we gained a solid investment from an investor who loved the concept.   One of the great things about Alphatise is that all the people I involved really believe in the product and want to see it succeed. 

Please explain your business model.

Suppliers pay a fee to offer deals that match their location and pricing structures.  Alphatise uses the deal timeframe, historic conversion rate and consumer demand to calculate the cost per offer.

Here is an example:  Let’s say an electronics manufacture has excess stock of 10 TVs.  After checking the Alphatise system, they discover that 30 people have stated that they are willing to purchase a TV for $1,200.

The data on Alphatise highlights that the conversion rate will be 40% – so the manufacturer makes the decision to offer the deal to all 30 people.

Of those who are offered the deal, the first 10 people to respond get the TV at a discounted price.    The TV manufacturer then pays Alphatise  $1.20 for each consumer to whom it offers the deal. Total advertising spend = $37.

It really is a win – win situation as the consumer gets a cheaper product, the manufacturer clears his excess stock and we make money from the deal!

What are you working on right now and what are you most excited about in the next three months? 

Right now we are in the final stages of developing the first version of Alphatise. I ’m also actively involved in the marketing, sales, future investment and legal processes.  What I am really excited about is the product launching in the market in the next few months and the public getting to try it out!   Over the past few years we have built up quite a following so people are ready and waiting to use the system.

How do you make ideas happen? 

Hard work, hard work and more hard work. The last couple of years has been extremely challenging.  When launching a project of this scale, you really need to be committed and ready to sacrifice everything to see the company succeed.

What does your typical day look like?

My main role within the company is to ensure everyone is working towards a common goal and we are delivering to a high standard.

 I start my day at 6:30, replying to emails and always speak to the Alphatise team before 9am.  For the rest of the day, I am mostly in meetings with key people such as investors and lawyers.

My day starts to slow down between 6-7pm but I do tend to take work home and work weekends.   It is my belief that you really do need to be 100% to your goal.  The good news is that I really love my work so don’t mind working long hours.

I think that’s the most important thing for any aspiring entrepreneur out there and the biggest advice I can pass on. Love what you do and if you’re passionate about it you’ll find yourself working 80-100 hours a week.

What challenges have you faced when starting or growing a business/organisation in Australia? 

The laws and regulations around the corporations act for raising capital, and also taxation.  I believe our local legislation make if rather difficult to keep the company within Australia – which often forces people to go public or go overseas.   This is a real shame and a challenging issue for entrepreneurs in Australia.

What people/companies/organisations do you think are doing really cool stuff in your industry at the moment? 

Uber is doing amazing things and is a clear example of how smart technology and information can improve our lives.

Are there opportunities for people to get involved with your idea (e.g. are you looking for funding, interns, marketing help)?

Early on we decided to be open and connect with as many people that could have a positive impact on the business.  This has really paid off!

We’re aiming to build a community of Australian idea makers helping each other. If you could have one question answered about start-ups, marketing, social media, accounting, monetization, product development etc. What would it be?

The laws and restrictions within Australia.  I would love to know when our government will start to recognise that start-ups and entrepreneurs are going overseas because our corporate laws are so outdated.

What’s your favourite bar/café/restaurant?

Bread and circus in Alexandra

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